2018
Pollinator Paradise

Roots and Shoots - Ecole Cobble Hill Elementary

Ecole Cobble Hill Elementary
  • Grade 3
  • Grade 4
  • Grade 5
  • Grade 6
  • Grade 7
Video Project (1 video)

Community Coach(es): 

Sarah Milne & Carrie Bryant

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Yes

Pollinator Paradise Project                    Feb 2018

Ecole Cobble Hill Roots and Shoots

Green Games Submission

 

Community Coaches:

Danya Hillyard

Sarah Milne

Carrie Bryant

 

“YOU CANNOT GET THROUGH A SINGLE DAY WITHOUT HAVING AN IMPACT ON THE WORLD AROUND YOU. WHAT YOU DO MAKES A DIFFERENCE, AND YOU HAVE TO DECIDE WHAT KIND OF DIFFERENCE YOU WANT TO MAKE.”

-Jane Goodall

 

Our Roots and Shoots club, at Ecole Cobble Hill, learned all about the importance of protecting pollinators, mostly for food security and biodiversity.  Afterwards, we took that knowledge and turned it into action, and created a Pollinator Paradise at our school!

First, we learned!  We invited two speakers to share their knowledge with our club.  They spoke about local pollinators and also native plants.      

From the pollinator enthusiast, we learned that birds, butterflies and bees are the main pollinators in our area.  We also learned a lot about bees in particular, because 80% of the flowering plants are pollinated by bees!  We need bees for food security, which means that everyone is able to get enough food to be healthy and active.

We discovered that we should not be afraid, because bees don’t want to string us.  They are too busy gathering food!  If we keep our distance and respect bees homes, we are perfectly safe watching bees work!

We also learned that bees are now threatened!  The main reasons for this big problem are; habitat loss, climate change, invasive species, and pesticides like neonicotinoids.  We wanted to help, so we wrote letters to local government to ban the use of neonics!

A local nursery expert visited our club to host a native plant talk and touch.  We learned the added importance of creating pollinator gardens with native plant; they are often the desired food, they use less water, they are low maintenance, they stay disease free, and they need no pesticides!  These gardens also provide and support biodiversity, the many kinds of living organisms and ecosystems, which is the foundation of life on earth!

Second, we took action!  We created a native garden, complete with food, water, protection and information.

We prepared a garden area on school grounds, by removing invasive non native weeds, and adding organic soil.  We planted many different kinds of drought tolerant, native shrubs and groundcovers, that are favourites of pollinators.  We also spread a custom mixture of drought tolerant, native, wildflower seeds, which will help provide food during all seasons.  Our club also offered water, with creative, up-cycled water catchers.  We attached them along the school fence, near the back of the garden.

We also provided homes and materials for pollinator protection.  We attached natural, home made birdhouses all along the school fence.  We drilled mason bee holes into logs and secured them in the ground.  We gathered creative, up-cycled material holders, and stuffed them full of organic materials for nesting, and attached them to the fence as well.

We wanted to share some of what we learned with the rest of the school.  To do so, we made a recycled wooden project sign.  Our club members also wrote out plant tags, for each plant, with the scientific and common names of the plants we used.

Our Roots and Shoots club learned so much about pollinators!  Who they are, why there are vital, what they need, and how we can help.  There are so many things we can all do, big and small!  We have great hope of sharing this information with our entire school, to evoke thought, inspire change, and empower students to protect our pollinators!